North Carolina’s Airport Development Study

North Carolina’s Airport Development Study

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Charlotte Douglas International Airport received its present name in 1982 and is the second biggest center point for American Airlines after Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, with administration to 175 residential and universal destinations. This airport is continuing to develop and needs to make another all-inclusive strategy to guide future advancement on the area encompassing the air terminal.

Charlotte Douglas is encompassed by extensive tracts of undeveloped area, particularly toward the west and north, and the city would like to support more improvement in those tracts. In an effort to assist with development, Charlotte City Council voted in favor of spending $900,000 worth of air terminal assets for an expert to concentrate on the range and suggest best uses for the area.

The airports lead development director, Stuart Hair, will lead the study along with MXD Development. The MXD Firm has previously made ground-breaking strategies for other air terminals and its experts will concentrate on recognizing perfect utilizations for the 20 square miles of area surrounding the freely subsidized Charlotte Douglas.The area between the airport and Catawba River has been surveyed by engineers and although it is for the most part lush and undeveloped, it offers a percentage of the biggest tracts of empty area in Mecklenburg County.

The hefty price tag came as a shock to many. Questions of whether or not nearly a million dollars was absolutely necessary to investigate how to develop the airport have been raised. Those in opposition of the study believe engineers only need proper market conditions instead of creating a master approach. However, those in favor of the development plan argue that because of the extent of the study range, broad effort and gatherings that are arranged by the specialists make the study a worthy investment.

 

The Micro Apartment Phenomena

The Micro Apartment Phenomena

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A micro-apartment, otherwise called a microflat, is a one-room, independent living space and is intended to suit a sitting space, washroom, resting space, and kitchenette with a size of 4-10 square meters. Now and again, inhabitants might likewise have admittance to a public restroom/shower, shared kitchen, porches and rooftop gardens.

The micro-apartments are frequently intended for draw down beds or futons, collapsing tables and work areas, and additional small apparatuses. An expansive 344-square-foot micro-apartment with sliding dividers joined to the tracks by the roof has been outlined by an engineer in Hong Kong, Gary Chang. By moving the dividers around, utilizing assembled as a part of collapsing furniture and workshops, he can change the space into 24 distinct rooms, including a pantry, kitchen, library, bar, computer game room, and lounge area. 

These apartments are popping up everywhere. Micro-housing is sensible in areas with high property values, supportive infrastructure for development, accessible public transportation, stable economies, walkable neighborhoods, and cities that are have fair to high density. The ever growing community of micro-housing is a new phenomenon in development. Below are few of the reasons why:  

 

The American Dream Deferred

Owning a home with a white picket fence is slowly falling off the list of goals for many people. There is no longer a desire to have a big space in the suburbs. Instead, many are holding off on getting married and having kids to remain in a smaller residence with easy access to city life.

Less Driving, More Walking

Living near city life means driving is not a necessity. Unlike many suburban areas, city life does not require a vehicle, which ultimately eliminate the task of looking for a parking spot after a long day of work.

Same City, Cheaper Apartment
Micro-apartments offer residence in cities that would almost be unaffordable for most. Many one-bedroom city apartments can be very expensive and for budget conscious renters, this makes living in the location of their dreams nearly impossible. Nearly. Micro-apartments cost hundreds of dollars less than average sized apartments to rent monthly.

Oakland : The Rise of America’s Most Underrated City

Carter Boehm discusses Oakland's resurging development

 

 

When people think of the Bay Area, the automatically think San Francisco, the Bay Bridge and Oakland. Things are rapidly changing in this regard. With increasing job growth leading up to 25 percent from 1990 to 2014, according to the California Center for Jobs and the Economy, due to boom in the technology sector, and a rising number of startup ecosystems in the area, Oakland is benefiting from San Francisco’s prosperity. And with 50 percent lower rates, the city has become a hotbed for San Francisco workers who can no longer afford to live in the city. Oakland, has become an alternative location for small business and startups in the area.

This development does not come without its challenges. With a soaring crime rate, and a listing as one of America’s most dangerous cities, there is still a reluctance in the development of housing. Critics believe that the growing demand for housing can trump this. Oakland’s building costs are 30 percent lower than San Francisco, and with a tremendous amount of construction in the area, more than 1,000 residences with affordable housing will increase in the area. One company named Lane Partners is an example of the development parties looking to develop housing properties in Oakland. The project – “ A great hope for Oakland” , offers edgy architecture that is attractive to technology and solar energy companies. This developer hopes to attract high rent in the area could boost overall office space sale. Lane partners has been on the forefront of developing tech space throughout the bay area and Silicon Valley for many years, so it is no surprise that Oakland was in the direction of its expansion.

Oakland’s beauty lies in its positioning as the city as a great regional hub, reachable by air, BART or train, and with less expensive accommodation than San Francisco people can explore the joys of the Bay Area without the security of affordable housing.

As more conversions take place other development companies based in the area also look to Oakland and East Oakland’s waterfront on both sides of the Jack London Square, as a new development prospect. Oakland based Signature Development recently completed an infrastructure known as “The Hive”. The Hive is a mixed use project that transformed a city block of historic structures near the 19th Street Bart Station and retail uses, plus 105 residential units.

Another renaissance it seems, is coming to Oakland. As resident weigh in on the boom in Oakland, it seems that tensions are rising with Oakland natives hoping that the city would not be be exploited commercially like her neighbor next door.

To learn more about the development boom in Oakland, visit this article by the Urban Land Institute

A World Reimagined- Building A City With Autonomous Cars

Carter Boehm discusses how autonomous cars could rule our highways

 

 

Something strange is happening in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The shadow of an emerging city creeps over the landscape, and by passers remain mystified by this unknown change, whose presence they can now feel. This shadow, this growing city over the landscape has been called -Mcity. Mcty is a place where transportation consists solely of robotic vehicles that steer themselves without a human at the wheel. This new innovation- driverless cars, must navigate several miles of the urban grid using a complex reliance on software, wireless communications, and sensor technology to get to and from their point of destination. Sounds impressive right? Well Mcity is just a simulation.

The buildings, as Urban Land Institute reports, “ are just facades, and the inhabitants unexpectedly step off curbs are just mechanized mannequins. Jonathan Levine, a University of Michigan professor of architecture and Urban Planning told the magazine “ You wouldn’t mistake it for a movie set, let alone a real city.” A new study introduced this year, relayed that the Boston Consulting Group, major automakers such as General motors are already rushing to add gadgetry that would give these cars an ability to pilot themselves on a low speed, stop and start traffic- jam conditions or in single lanes on highways, or even to find parking spaces and pull into them without human help.

This technology could really change the way we see our landscapes, in the same way that the urban street car or interstate highway was instrumental in developing the suburban and urban landscape in the US. “I think it’s going to be the most important transformational change in 100 years,” says Randall K. Rowe, chairman of Green Courte Partners, an Illinois-based private equity real estate investment firm. “It’s going to change the way we get around, the way we transport goods, and how we look at land use.”

Many experts in varying fields believe that driverless cars could start a revolution in the way we live. In a previous post, I mentioned some of the propositions for a walkable city. Well, not everyone is in full agreement with the Mcity model. Many worry about safety first, even though autonomous vehicle advocates point to Google’s experience, in which its experimental vehicles have travelled for 1.7 million miles on regular road, and a total of 11 minor accidents to its name. There are other debates on the table which present the argument that autonomous cars can free our roads of distracted drivers, and this in turn could make our cities even much more walkable.

Whether a city is walkable or driverless, it is important to remember that technological advancements in society have the ability to impact our landscape in a way that could potentially benefit or drive us out of our living spaces.

To learn more about MCity and the reimagination of a city without drivers, visit this article by Urban Land Institute

How European Cities Can Densify

ULI Europe has undertaken a broad effort to investigate the issue of densification and how European cities can densify in ways that keep the focus on people and create livable, vibrant, and thriving places. While discussions of density in the popular media often focus on the rapidly urbanizing megacities of Asia and Africa, the question of how to develop land most efficiently without sacrificing quality of life or opportunity is as urgent in Europe as it is elsewhere, a new report argues.

The Density Dividend: Solutions for Growing and Shrinking Cities says that density is a tool applicable to all cities no matter where they are in their growth cycles. In Europe, cities vary widely in terms of population growth: a few are attracting newcomers at a steady clip, whereas many others are steadily losing population through out-migration or low birth rates, or both. Several cities—particularly those in the former Eastern Bloc—built isolating residential towers, sprawling single-use suburbs, and gated communities that are now proving to be liabilities.

“Density is an essential component of how cities manage and accommodate the ebb and flow of urban change,” write coauthors Greg Clark, senior fellow at ULI Europe, and Tim Moonen, director of intelligence at the Business of Cities Ltd. “Today, the drivers of population growth, economic change, new lifestyle demands, and sustainability mean Europe’s cities have little choice but to optimize their land use and reimagine density for people,”

The Density Dividend was recently discussed at a panel on density and sprawl held during the 2015 ULI Fall Meeting in San Francisco. Alice Breheny, global cohead of research at TH Real Estate, a key sponsor of the report, remarked that the rural-to-urban migration occurring elsewhere in the world “finished a long time ago” in Europe. Nonetheless, European cities still need to densify in order to attract consumers who are moving to cities not out of economic necessity, but simply because they want to.

“The population isn’t growing organically anymore, apart from in a handful of locations,” Breheny said during the panel. “The move of people, urbanization, and densification is more about choice or the global nature of the workforce now and how mobile that is.” (Watch a video of this session.)

Published in October, The Density Dividend is a follow-up to an earlier publication,Density: Drivers, Dividends, and Debates, which set out to define what good density looks like, address myths and misperceptions around density, and differentiate the well-intentioned but misguided attempts at densification of the past from current efforts.

To illustrate how density can help cities regardless of whether they are growing, shrinking, or slowly rebounding, the report offers case studies of six cities that are at different points in their evolutionary paths. It identifies challenges each city faces in terms of maximizing density’s potential to suit its needs as well as strategies that are working to meet demand in scalable and sustainable ways, accentuate assets to attract new investment, or consolidate in cases where land is vacant and underused. The report’s findings were informed by forums held in each of the cities where feedback from stakeholders was incorporated into the final report.

Here are some case studies

Strongly Growing Cities: London, Istanbul, Stockholm

London, Istanbul, and Stockholm are identified as cities that continue to attract new businesses and residents in search of opportunity. Their central dilemma is how to ramp up development in ways that are human in scale.

London and Stockholm are two growing cities that are densifying thoughtfully, according to the report. Long-range planning has been key to their efforts.

In London, the London Housing Strategy has created a clear blueprint for delivering 42,000 new homes within a year. The strategy divides the city into 18 housing zones, which will allow local authorities to assemble and package brownfield land for development and obtain planning permission in advance. A “housing bank” that provides loans and other banking services to developers and housing associations to fund new home construction and renovation has been created as part of the strategy.

To learn more about other densifying cities in Europe , view this article Urban Land Institute

3 Important Questions To Ask Before You Purchase Land

Becoming a first time home owner can be a daunting and sometimes cumbersome process, and purchasing your first plot of land can be just the same whether it’s a lot in a development or acres of land. Let’s go over some of the basics to help ease your mind purchasing a spot for your dream home and allow you to sign that contract with confidence.

Getting started, it’s essential to identify exactly what it is you’re looking for and rank what qualities are most important to you in case you (and it’s quite possible you will) have to compromise on what you want. There is no “perfect” lot out there. This will help eliminate properties that don’t match your requirements and aren’t worth looking at. Create a checklist to help stay organized and rank the listings you look at.

Here are 3 questions you will definitely need to know the answers to:

Can you build the floor plan you desire for the lot?

You need to determine if the land can be used how you envision it. Laws from state to state vary so it’s important to research this before you look up  anything. Keep in mind that selling a buyer an unbuildable (or not suited for what you want) lot is not illegal.

For example, say you would like to build a four-bedroom, two story house but the lot is restricted to only one story ranchers. This would be a problem.

Where is your water coming from?

The land you’re looking at could already have a well drilled or already shares a well with neighbors or you might have to drill your own. These are all potential options. If a well is in place, make sure to obtain the depth, flow rate, and quality of water from the well.

What is the Zoning?

For every lot there are zoning ordinances set up by the localized planning board. This is designed to regulate how the land is used and that is in accordance with their goals for the area. For example, say you wanted to start a cattle farm. You can view as many acres of land as you like, but if it is not zoned properly, you will not be having cattle.

Ask these Questions too:

What’s the soil type?

Are there high water tables?

Are there any issues with sewer drainage?

Purchasing land is an exciting venture and getting as much knowledge as possible will help make the process easier for you and hopefully, make it a pleasurable one.

Info courtesy of buildingadvisor

3 Things To Know About Building a Real Estate Career

Real Estate is a versatile field. The ability to wear many hats on and off the ground, as well as the opportunity to engage in communications, government relations, buying and land development capacity is key to the success and understanding of this part of the business. There are many options within the field, and plenty of careers to choose from in development within the commercial or residential side of the business. People who find joy or interest in building homes or living spaces usually find themselves in residential real estate. The commercial end is not limited by personal taste, but is bigger in scale and one will find themselves dealing with larger property. This side of the business attracts people who are sales oriented and interested in commerce.

Here are 3 things to consider when you are looking to begin a career in real estate.

  1. Education and Licensing :Taking a real estate pre-licensing course within your state is important to gain certification. Different states have different rules and mandates in the issue of gaining your license as a real estate agent. Passing state and national licensing exams will also prove to be helpful in gaining the first brokerage experience at an agency.
  2. Brokerage and mentorship experience: Working in a brokerage gives agents the opportunity to gain clients and learn the ins and outs of working at a real estate firm. Brokerages are the offices from which real estate agents and brokers work. Working with a broker is a requirement in order to practice as a real estate agent, contacting a broker before graduating from a real estate course in order to learn more about the business is one of the best ways to learn about the business and what working in a brokerage entails. Most brokers tend to have three additional years of real estate training, and they can provide answers to questions on working within the agency.
  3. Developing a Real Estate Agent Budget: Learning to manage one’s self and finances will go a long way in working in this business. Unlike most professions, the startup costs of working in real estate are relatively reasonable. Some of the costs range from $1,500- 2000. It is often divided amongst business cards, signs, advertising and association fees.


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Being a real estate agent means that you are making money based on commission. It is a commission based business so keeping money aside for a few months is highly encouraged, especially when you are just beginning in the field.

To find out more about real estate and real estate careers see this extensive write up on investopedia